Defender of divine revelation: Timothy Dwight's arguments for the Bible's authenticity and divine inspiration

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Defender of divine revelation: Timothy Dwight's arguments for the Bible's authenticity and divine inspiration

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Title: Defender of divine revelation: Timothy Dwight's arguments for the Bible's authenticity and divine inspiration
Author: Werner, Aaron John
Advisor: Beougher, Timothy K.
Abstract: This dissertation examines Timothy Dwight's (1752-1817) arguments for the Bible's authenticity with the purpose of determining if his arguments are theologically orthodox, logically sound, and factually accurate. Chapter 1 introduces this dissertation's thesis, research problem, methodology, and its limitations. Attention is given to Timothy Dwight's theological milieu and the reasons he felt compelled to defend the Bible's authenticity in a Christian nation.

Chapter 2 examines Dwight's arguments for the necessity of special revelation. He thought that readers would not find his arguments for the Bible's authenticity compelling unless they first were convinced that a revelation is necessary. Hence, according to Dwight, his entire case depends on the validity of this particular argument. After outlining Dwight's defense, this chapter attempts determine if it is theologically orthodox, logically sound, and factually accurate.

Chapter 3 presents Dwight's arguments for the authenticity of the Old Testament. After outlining his contention, this chapter scrutinizes its content to determine if it is theologically orthodox, logically sound, and factually accurate.

Chapter 4 presents Dwight's argument for the authenticity of the New Testament. After outlining his line of reasoning, this chapter analyzes its content to determine if it is theologically orthodox, logically sound, and factually accurate.

Chapter 5 summarizes this dissertation, which concludes that Dwight's arguments for the Bible's authenticity are theologically orthodox, factually accurate, and--with a few exceptions--logically sound. This chapter also suggests areas for future research.

Description: This item is only available to students and faculty of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. If you are not associated with SBTS, this dissertation may be purchased from http://disexpress.umi.com/dxweb or downloaded through ProQuest's Dissertation and Theses database if your institution subscribes to that service.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10392/435
Date: 2007-10-15

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