Syntactical comparison between Classical Hebrew and Classical Arabic based on the translation of Moh[dotbelow]ammad `Id's Arabic grammar

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Syntactical comparison between Classical Hebrew and Classical Arabic based on the translation of Moh[dotbelow]ammad `Id's Arabic grammar

Show full item record

Title: Syntactical comparison between Classical Hebrew and Classical Arabic based on the translation of Moh[dotbelow]ammad `Id's Arabic grammar
Author: Griess, Ihab Joseph
Advisor: Fuller, Russell T.
Abstract: This dissertation orchestrates a systematic comparison of syntax between Classical Arabic and Classical Hebrew. Chapter 1 introduces the reader to the origin of Arabic language, its history from efflorescence to decline, the different grammatical schools of Arabic, and the resurgence of the traditional Hebrew grammar after Arabic paradigms through what is called "Judaeo-Arabic."

Chapter 2 is the translation of Moh[dotbelow]ammad `Id's standard Arabic Grammar with its five sections. The first section introduces the reader to the two main divisions of Arabic grammar: nominal and verbal sentences and their different components. In addition, a variety of nominal-related topics, e.g., the Six Nouns, diptotes and triptotes, duals, sound masculine and feminine plurals, proper names, and pronouns are presented. This is besides other verbal-related topics, e.g., the Five Verbs, and R 3 weak imperfect. The second section is dedicated to the nominal sentence. It focuses on the characteristics of the main components of the nominal sentence, their case-markings, and the transformative verbs and particles that induce changes on these case-markings. The third section focuses on the main components of the verbal sentence: verb, subject, and object. It also discusses the different moods of the Arabic imperfect, and the various types of Arabic objects: direct object, absolute object, accusatives of cause/reason, and the accusatives of accompaniment. The fourth section discusses topics that are generally related to both verbal and nominal sentences, e.g., adjectives, elatives, participles, and exclamation. The fifth section is restricted to only some special grammatical topics: Casus Pendens, numbers, and indirect expressions of numerals.

Chapter 3 synchronically focuses on some topics that touch directly on Hebrew grammar and syntax: the verbal sentence, verbless sentence, h[dotbelow]al , emphasis, and negation.

Chapter 4 is the conclusion that brings us back to the reason of launching this project---namely, an attempt to revive the old Jewish scholarly tradition.

Description: This item is only available to students and faculty of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. If you are not associated with SBTS, this dissertation may be purchased from http://disexpress.umi.com/dxweb or downloaded through ProQuest's Dissertation and Theses database if your institution subscribes to that service.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10392/414
Date: 2006-08-11

Files in this item

Files Size Format View
3231687.pdf 7.659Mb PDF Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Search BDL


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account