An analysis of factors that motivate Campus Crusade for Christ staff to enter Vocational Christian Service

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An analysis of factors that motivate Campus Crusade for Christ staff to enter Vocational Christian Service

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Title: An analysis of factors that motivate Campus Crusade for Christ staff to enter Vocational Christian Service
Author: Weakley, Thomas Wayne
Advisor: Bredfeldt, Gary J.
Abstract: This dissertation identifies and rank orders key factors that motivate and influence Campus Crusade for Christ Staff members, during their college experience, to accept the calling of God and enter vocational Christian service. By investigating these factors, this study can aid in developing laborers for the harvest.

The research consisted of administering the research instrument with one hundred and eighty-five research participants. The instrument provided both demographic and motivational factor data for analysis. The targeted population for this study was the new staff of Campus Crusade for Christ in the summer of 2004. The analysis and findings of the data relate to four motivational factors: Theological, Relational, Mentoring, and Ministry experiences.

The first research question measured six theological motivational factors: the lostness of man, eternal perspective, lordship of Christ, stewardship of life, the great commission, and spiritual calling. The findings of the study indicated the eternal perspective factor as the most influential theological factor. A casual observation from the research also found that of the four motivational factors, (e.g., Theological, Relational, Mentoring, and Ministry experiences) the Theological motivational factors were ranked the most important.

The second research question tested the influence of six relational factors: current church, small group, other peers, parental, mentor, and professional minister. The mentor relationship was found to be the most influential relational factor. Along with the relational factors, the third research questioned measured the type of mentoring and the influence of mentoring on the participants. The intensive staff mentoring category was found to be the most influential category of mentoring.

The last motivational factor measured in the study involved eleven different ministry experiences. The findings found that the ministry experiences were the second most influential category of motivational factors. It was concluded that the ministry experiences had a cumulative impact on the participants as the experience was often accomplished in a relational atmosphere. The current study indicates that numerous factors motivate one to accept the call of God and enter Vocational Christian Service.

Description: This item is only available to students and faculty of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. If you are not associated with SBTS, this dissertation may be purchased from http://disexpress.umi.com/dxweb or downloaded through ProQuest's Dissertation and Theses database if your institution subscribes to that service.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10392/347
Date: 2005-05-01

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