The Theological Development of the Biblical Counseling Movement from 1988

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The Theological Development of the Biblical Counseling Movement from 1988

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Title: The Theological Development of the Biblical Counseling Movement from 1988
Author: Lambert, Heath Blane
Advisor: Powlison, David
Abstract: This dissertation examines how the thought uder girding the biblical counseling movement as founded by Jay Adams has developed since 1988 Chapter 1 examines the historical and theological context for that development. This chapter is concerned to set the context necessary in understanding the work to follow.

Chapter 2 evaluates the conceptual development of the biblical counseling movement. The development in the movement regarding sin and suffering and motivational issues is considered.

Chapter 3 addresses the methodological development of the biblical counseling movement. The shift from the formal and authoritative method of Adams to the relational method of the second generation of leaders is documented.

Chapter 4 tackles the apologetic development of the biblical counseling movement. The chapter highlights the various approaches in engaging with outsiders of the movement.

Chapter 5 engages the work of Eric Johnson Johnson is the only other scholar who seriously evaluates the counseling movement as anything other than monolithic. This chapter assesses the correctness of his approach.

Chapter 6 seeks to address areas in further need of development with regard to motivational issues in biblical counseling. Efforts are made here to further develop a biblical counseling understanding of human motivation.

Chapter 7 concludes this dissertation. The argument is made that, in evaluating the development of the biblical counseling movement, it is important to embrace the founding work of the first generation and the developing work of the second generation, being thankful for each.

This work argues that the biblical counseling movement is one, single movement that has experienced conceptual, methodological, and apologetic development from a first, founding generation to a second, developing generation. It is further argued that this development has improved the theological foundation of the movement.

Description: This item is only available to students and faculty of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. If you are not associated with SBTS, this dissertation may be purchased from http://disexpress.umi.com/dxweb or downloaded through ProQuest's Dissertation and Theses database if your institution subscribes to that service.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10392/2948
Date: 2009-12-01

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